present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!

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present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,bob体育官网present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!

present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,bob官方下载苹果present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!bob体育

present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,bob体育下载链接present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!

present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,bob足球体育下载,bob体育官方下载present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!

present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!,bob官方app下载present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!bob体育棋牌,present of them, Sonia,' she said, 'please do.' 'Please do,' she said, she wanted them so much. And when could she wear them? They just reminded her of her old happy days. She looked at herself in the glass, admired herself, and she has no clothes at all, no things of her own, hasn't had all these years! And she never asks any one for anything; she is proud, she'd sooner give away everything. And these she asked for, she liked them so much. And I was sorry to give them. 'What use are they to you, Katerina Ivanovna?' I said. I spoke like that to her, I ought not to have said that! She gave me such a look. And she was so grieved, so grieved at my refusing her. And it was so sad to see.... And she was not grieved for the collars, but for my refusing, I saw that. Ah, if only I could bring it all back, change it, take back those words! Ah, if I... but it's nothing to you!" "Did you know Lizaveta, the pedlar?" "Yes.... Did you know her?" Sonia asked with some surprise. "Katerina Ivanovna is in consumption, rapid consumption; she will soon die," said Raskolnikov after a pause, without answering her question. "Oh, no, no, no!" And Sonia unconsciously clutched both his hands, as though imploring that she should not. "But it will be better if she does die." "No, not better, not at all better!" Sonia unconsciously repeated in dismay. "And the children? What can you do except take them to live with you?" "Oh, I don't know," cried Sonia, almost in despair, and she put her hands to her head. It was evident that that idea had very often occurred to her before and he had only roused it again. "And, what, if even now, while Katerina Ivanovna is alive, you get ill and are taken to the hospital, what will happen then?" he persisted pitilessly. "How can you? That cannot be!" And Sonia's face worked with awful terror. "Cannot be?" Raskolnikov went on with a harsh smile. "You are not insured against it, are you? What will happen to them then? They will be in the street, all of them, she will cough and beg and knock her head against some wall, as she did to-day, and the children will cry.... Then she will fall down, be taken to the police station and to the hospital, she will die, and the children..." "Oh, no.... God will not let it be!" broke at last from Sonia's overburdened bosom. She listened, looking imploringly at him, clasping her hands in dumb entreaty, as though it all depended upon him. Raskolnikov got up and began to walk about the room. A minute passed. Sonia was standing with her hands and her head hanging in terrible dejection. "And can't you save? Put by for a rainy day?" he asked, stopping suddenly before her. "No," whispered Sonia. "Of course not. Have you tried?" he added almost ironically. "Yes." "And it didn't come off! Of course not! No need to ask." And again he paced the room. Another minute passed. "You don't get money every day?" Sonia was more confused than ever and colour rushed into her face again. "No," she whispered with a painful effort. "It will be the same with Polenka, no doubt," he said suddenly. "No, no!

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